Meghan Riehl’s Summer 2013 Keck Fellowship

Meghan Riehl’s Summer 2013 Keck Fellowship

Thermal evolution and provenance of the Sitka Graywacke from Baranof Island, Alaska revealed through detrital zircon fission track dating
For about four weeks in June and July of this year, I had the opportunity to participate in the KECK project led by Prof. John Garver (Union College) and Prof. Cam Davidson (Carleton College) in Alaska. Myself and five other geology students from around the United States are currently working on our thesis work based on the samples collected in Alaska. My samples are of the Sitka Graywacke and were collected along approximately north-south and east-west transects in locations in and surrounding the Sitka Sound near Sitka, Alaska. We do not know the source regions for the Sitka Graywacke, but all considerations involve a right-lateral strike slip movement eastward of the sample locations. The Sitka Graywacke was originally a deep-water turbidite sequence that was buried under the earth’s surface where it was later metamorphosed. Studies on the thermal history through Zircon fission track dating of the graywacke samples will provide a better understanding of the provenance of the Sitka Graywacke.