Courses

Academic Register

Click here to get to the Philosophy Department’s courses and course descriptions.

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Introductory Courses

Introductory Courses, whether issues-oriented or historically-oriented, do not presuppose any prior acquaintance with philosophy. They may be taken in any order. For more advising information, consult the Philosophy Department website.

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Issues-oriented Courses

PHL-100. Introduction to Philosophy

An introduction to some of the most enduring questions of philosophy: Does God exist? Might the external world be an illusion? Is science rational? What is the relationship between the mind and the body? What is it to be moral, and why should one bother?

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Historically-oriented Courses

PHL-150. Ancient Philosophy. An examination of issues debated by ancient Greek and Roman philosophers that became central to western philosophy, including the nature of reality, the criteria for knowledge, the difference between good and pleasure, and the principles of political justice. Discussion of readings from the PreSocratics, Plato, Aristotle, the Epicureans and the Stoics.

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Intermediate Courses

Intermediate Courses do not presuppose any prior acquaintance with philosophy. They may be taken in any order; and are pitched at a level that is more appropriate for second and higher year students than for first year students. However, in some cases an order for taking intermediate courses is recommended (for this and other advising information, consult the Philosophy Department website).

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Advanced Courses

Advanced courses may be taken in any order, although in some cases certain orders will be recommended. Unlike Introductory and Intermediate courses, most advanced courses presuppose that the student has already taken at least two philosophy courses. Although first and second year students will be allowed to take advanced courses, these courses are pitched at a level that is more appropriate for third and fourth year students.

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