Courses in French

Updated Course List @ Registrar

FRN-303. Advanced French (Not offered 2013-14).

Advanced language training for students who have completed the term abroad in Rennes or who have had similar experience. Examination of finer points of grammar, stylistics, and phonetics. Prerequisite: FRN-204T or equivalent.

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FRN-250T, 251T. The French Language Studied Independently Abroad

FRN-250T, 251T. The French Language Studied Independently Abroad.

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FRN-204T-207T. The French Language Studied Abroad

(Fall term in Rennes).

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FRN-201. Intermediate French II

(Winter, Spring). Continuation of extensive review and development, vocabulary building, conversation, and composition. Prerequisite: FRN-200 or equivalent.

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FRN-200. Intermediate French I

(Fall, Winter).  Intensive review and development of all language skills, with emphasis on vocabulary building, conversation, and composition. Prerequisite: FRN-102 or equivalent.

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FRN-102. Basic French III

(Fall, Spring).  A continuation of FRN-101, with introduction of readings. Prerequisite: FRN-101 or three years of secondary school French

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FRN-101. Basic French II

(Winter, Spring). A continuation of FRN-100. Prerequisite: FRN-100 or two years of secondary school French.

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FRN-100. Basic French I

(Fall, Winter). Basic skills for students who begin with no knowledge of French.

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French Language Sequence

FRN-100. Basic French I (Fall, Winter). Basic skills for students who begin with no knowledge of French. FRN-101. Basic French II (Winter, Spring). A continuation of FRN-100. Prerequisite: FRN-100 or two years of secondary school French. FRN-102. Basic French III (Fall, Spring). A continuation of FRN-101, with introduction of readings. Prerequisite: FRN-101 or three years of secondary school French FRN-200. Intermediate French I (Fall, Winter). Intensive review and development of all language skills, with emphasis on vocabulary building, conversation, and composition. Prerequisite: FRN-102...

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MLT-211. Histoire de la danse, Danse de l’histoire / History of Dance, Dance of History

 (Also FRN-421, ADA-153) (Not offered 2013-14). Examination of Western European dance and dance texts as revelatory of broader historical and cultural patterns, with special analyses of dance as a key tool of nation-building (as with the court of Louis XIV) and/or a central medium of artistic creation (as in 1920s Paris). Primary focus on France as creator, user, and potential abuser of dance’s power, but some attention given other European models (Berlin, St. Petersburg, London). Readings from theoreticians, historians, and dance littérateurs (Molière, Gautier, Cocteau). CC: HUL,...

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MLT-212: Sex Lives and Videotape: Casting Sexuality in French and Francophone Film

 (Also FRN-402) (Not offered 2013-14). Analysis and critique of films whose focus is the “sexual orientation” of its characters. Films may include La Cage aux folles, Les Diaboliques, French Twist, Sitcom, Ma Vie en rose, Woubi Chéri. Theoretical and critical works by authors such as Michel Foucault, Monique Wittig, Simone de Beauvoir, Susan Hayward, Laura Mulvey, Sigmund Freud, and Kate Bornstein will inform our study of these films. Readings in both French and English. All films subtitled. CC: LCC, HUL

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MLT-213. West African Oral Literature

 (Also FRN 430) (not offered 2013-2014). West-African oral genres with a focus on tales and epics in their form and ideologies. Through a study of the oral literature of the region, we will explore the socio-cultural structures of ancient West Africa, their collapse through religious and colonial implications, and their vestiges in today’s Africa. CC: HUL, LCC

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MLT-215. What is French Cinéma?/Qu’est-ce que le cinéma français? (

(Also FRN-312) (Winter; Chilcoat). This course moves from an introduction to the earliest examples of French and world cinema, to an in-depth study of widely recognized classics of French cinema, considered in chronological order from 1933 to 1985, so as to develop an appreciation for the history, genre, and particular theme(s) of each film, as well as its originality. Students will learn how to talk about and write analytical papers on the films according to critical, cultural, and technological considerations, in order to determine what, if anything, is particularly “French” about French...

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