Courses in Spanish

Updated Course List @ Registrar

SPN-407. Cultures in Contact (and Conflict) in Contemporary Spain

 (Winter, Mueller) In this course we will study narrative, theater, film, music, political documents, and television shows from three culturally and linguistically distinct regions of Spain: Galicia, Catalonia, and the Basque Country. In our analyses of these texts we will discuss key components of national identity, including language, traditions, geography, historical memory, political repression and violence, and gender, as well as contemporary challenges to traditional definitions of the nation. Prerequisite: Spanish 201 or permission of the instructor. CC: HUL, LCC,...

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SPN-400. Chivalry, Knighthood, and Don Quixote

(Winter, Martinez). This course explores what is considered the first modern novel: its place within the historical and literary context of the time it was written, the complexities of the narrative, and its continued popularity 400 years after its initial publication. Related articles will provide background information and points of departure for discussion. By the end of the course students will have better knowledge of the period known as the Golden Age of Spanish literature, the Renaissance in Spain, and the famous text itself; and they will recognize the international influence the...

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SPN-250T, 251T. The Spanish Language Studied Independently Abroad

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SPN-209T. Mexican Civilization

(Not offered 2013-14)

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SPN-208T. Spanish Civilization

(Winter). See International Programs.

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SPN-204T-207T. The Spanish Language Studied Abroad

(Winter). See International Programs.

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SPN-203. Advanced Spanish

(Fall, Winter, Spring). The course emphasizes the further development of composition and writing skills using the process-writing approach. Writing production will consist of expository and creative pieces based on cultural and literary readings. Prerequisite: SPN-202 or permission of the instructor. CC: LCC

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SPN-202. Intermediate Spanish III

 (Fall, Winter, Spring). Continuation of the intensive and accelerated grammar review and vocabulary growth initiated in the previous course. Further development of conversation and writing skills based on literary texts. Prerequisite: Spanish 201 or a score of 3+ on AP Spanish exam.

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SPN-201. Intermediate Spanish II

 (Fall, Winter, Spring). Continuation of the intensive and accelerated grammar review and vocabulary growth initiated in the previous course. Further development of conversation and writing skills based on cultural and literary texts. Prerequisite: SPN-200 or AP Spanish credit in high school

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SPN-200. Intermediate Spanish I

(Fall, Winter, Spring). Intensive and accelerated grammar review, and vocabulary growth. Further development of conversation and writing skills based on cultural texts. Prerequisite: SPN-102 or equivalent or four years of secondary school Spanish.

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SPN-102. Basic Spanish III

(Spring). A continuation of Spanish II. This course further develops all language skills. Prerequisite: SPN-101 or three years of Spanish at high school level. Attendance of weekly sessions with the language assistant is required.

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SPN-101. Basic Spanish II

(Winter). A continuation of Spanish I. This course further develops all language skills. Prerequisite: SPN-100 or two years of Spanish at high school level. Attendance of weekly sessions with the language assistant is required.

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SPN-100. Basic Spanish I

 (Fall). An introduction to the study of the Spanish language and culture through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. No prior knowledge of Spanish is required. Attendance of weekly sessions with the language assistant is required.

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Spanish Language Sequence

SPN-100. Basic Spanish I (Fall). An introduction to the study of the Spanish language and culture through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. No prior knowledge of Spanish is required. Attendance of weekly sessions with the language assistant is required. SPN-101. Basic Spanish II (Winter). A continuation of Spanish I. This course further develops all language skills. Prerequisite: SPN-100 or two years of Spanish at high school level. Attendance of weekly sessions with the language assistant is required. SPN-102. Basic Spanish III (Spring). A continuation of Spanish II. This course...

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MLT-270. The Way of St. James: An Interdisciplinary Study

(Also AAH-212) (Winter, Martínez). Prerequisite to the course “Hiking the Trail in Spain.” Teaches the history, literature, art, and architecture of the route to Santiago de Compostela in northern Spain. Readings include selections from Berceo, the Songs of Mary, and various texts on Romanesque art and architecture. CC: HUL, LCC

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MLT-271T. Hiking the Trail in Spain

 (Also AAH-213T) (Summer, Martínez). Students who take this “mini-term” abroad must have taken MLT-270 on campus. The course takes place in Spain, where students will walk a portion of the actual route to Santiago de Compostela. CC: LCC, HUL

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MLT-272. Art and Politics in Spain: From the Civil War to Postfrancoism and Postmodernity

 (Not offered 2013-14). The impact that political events of this century in Spain have had on Spanish society and culture, as manifested in the arts in general and in literature in particular. CC: HUL, LCC

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MLT-273. Re-Viewing Spanish Cinema: From Dictators, Bullfighters and Flamenco to Nationalisms and Globalization

(Not offered 2013-14). This course examines the works of such well-known artists/filmmakers as Medem, Almodóvar, Bigas Luna, de la Iglesia, Aménabar, among others, who often directly engage with questions of “Spanishness,” of the nature of regional and ethnic diversity and identities within Spain, and the place of these identities in the wider framework of filmmaking in Europe. Furthermore, it will also study popular cinema which has been successful in a national context under the Franco regime and since the coming of democracy in the 1970s. CC: LCC, HUL

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MLT-281. Screening Identities in Latin American Cinema

(Not offered 2013-14 ). A survey of the main trends in film production in Latin America since the 1950s (Mexican Golden Age Cinema, Brazilian Cinema Novo, Cuban Imperfect Cinema, Mexican New Wave, the 1990’s and beyond). Readings and discussions on issues of film history, aesthetics, representation and reception will frame our critical reflection on the construction of identities (inner-city youth, gender roles, masculinities, race and ethnicity, and US Latinos). CC: HUL

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MLT-282. North/South Relations and Diasporic Politics

(Not offered 2013-14). This course explores the cultural and political interaction between North and South that historically has helped to define the geography of the Americas. As an interdisciplinary course, North/South will draw students into ongoing debates about linguistic and intercultural exchange and conflict within hemispheric politics. CC: HUL, LCC

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MLT-283. Beyond the Sunny Paradise: Literature and Politics in the Caribbean

(Not offered 2013-14). An interdisciplinary study of Caribbean literature focusing on the political history of the region from 1898 to the present. Pan-Caribbean literary survey (Alvarez, Arenas, Bosch, Cartagena-Portalatin, Zobel, Danticat, Ferre, Kincaid, Naipaul, Santos-Febres, Ana Lydia Vega, among others). Besides the literary texts, films and substantive readings will contribute to an examination of five main topics: Legacies of Colonialism; Race and Ethnicity; Constructed Identities; U.S. Dominance and Interventionism; and Caribbean Diaspora. CC: HUL, LCC

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MLT-284. Popular Religion and Politics in Latin America

 (Not offered 2013-14). In this course we will examine the connection between politics and popular religions in Latin America, taking a critical view of several of their manifestations without losing track of the language and “sciences” historically used to describe them. We will engage biblical, anthropological, videographic, ethno-historical and cultural theory texts as well as oral histories and collective memories. The final goal is to tease out those ideas that have traditionally defined the terms in which we understand and explain the “popular” in religious behavior; to understand...

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MLT-285. From Virgin to Sex Goddess: Re-Envisioning the Chicana Experience Through Art and Literature

(Not offered 2013-14). In “Guadalupe the Sex Goddess,” Sandra Cisneros gives the Virgin of Guadalupe an “extreme makeover.” She undresses the sacred image and envelops her in a cloak of contemporary sexual politics. In the same vein, other Chicana artists and writers re-examine, re-present, and re-write traditional practices to define the experience of the Mexican-American woman in the late 20th century. This course presents students with the resisting and affirming powers of Chicana works of art. It introduces them to the Mexican-American civil rights movement and to myths and archetypes in...

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MLT-286T. Gender and Identity in Contemporary Brazilian Cinema

(Fall, Mosquera).The course is a survey of contemporary Brazilian cinema focusing on issues of representation, reception and spectatorship, and construction of (national, cultural, gender, and racial) identity. Besides the films, reviews and substantive readings will contribute to an examination of five main topics: 1) Constructions of Gender; 2) Representations of National Identity; 3) Race and Class; 4) Queer Images; and, 5) Imagining Marginality. All films studied in class will link two or more of these topics. CC: LCC, HUL

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MLT-287. Filming Margins: Cinema Verité and Social Realism in Latin America

 (Not offered 2013-14). This course studies different styles of documentary and realist film making from Latin America. It looks critically and with a “film-eye” at the aesthetics and socio-political meanings of conventional and experimental documentary films dealing with marginalized peoples and their representation, such as Buñuel’s Los Olvidados (1950), Hector Babenco’s Pixote (1981) and Fernando Meirelles’ City of God (2002), and others. CC: LCC, HUL

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MLT-288. Torture and Dictatorship in Latin American Literature

(Not offered 2013-14). This course is an exploration of Latin-American literature in the twentieth century with a particular focus on the Dirty War in Argentina (1976-1983) and the early years after the military coups in Uruguay and Chile during the same time period. Readings include texts by writers who stayed in Argentina and Chile and who wrote under the confines of censorship, texts by exiled writers and essays theories of violence, torture and censorship. The class will also include viewings and analysis of films related to the events in those countries. We will also discuss the...

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MLT-289. Literature of the Mexican-American Border

(Not offered 2013-14). This is a class in literature, film and essays from both sides of the Mexican-American border. This course is designed to give students an under-standing of the complexities of the history, culture and sense of identity of residents from both sides. The class will be discussion based and will focus on the close readings of novels, poems, short stories and plays. CC: HUL, LCC

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MLT-293. Made in New York: Puerto Rican and Dominican Transnational Identities in American Literature & Cinema

(Fall, García) The course is a survey of the cultural production and representation of the Dominican and Puerto Rican communities in New York City from the late 1950’s to the present. Through the analysis of literary texts (narrative, poetry, theater) and films, students are encouraged to reflect on the forging of transnational identities and other issues (race, cultural identity, gender and masculinities) related to these two Caribbean diasporic communities in the U.S., and on the politics of their representation within the American cultural economy. CC: HUL

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MLT-294. Generation X: Global Youth Culture in Fiction and Film

(Not offered 2013-14) In this course we will examine the production of Generation X literature and culture worldwide. We will begin the course by gaining an understanding of the roots and meaning of “Generation X” since the US post-war period, to its various outgrowths around the world. We will examine how the axis of a “GenX” consciousness plays itself out in countries around the world in narrative, film, art, and music. Possible authors, artists and directors include Canadian Douglas Coupland, American Richard Linklater, Spaniard Ray Loriga, Chilean Alberto Fuguet, Bolivian Edmundo...

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