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MLT-239. Retelling the Tales of the Brothers Grimm

 (Also GER-340) (Winter, Nelson). This course investigates the folk an fairy tales of the Brothers Grimm in literature and film, as well as in their cultural, historical, social, and ideological contexts. Specific focus is on the “retelling” and “rewriting” of these tales – both by the Brothers Grimm from older French and Italian tales and by Walt Disney and modern Hollywood – in order to study the similarities and difference in narrative structures, themes, and layers of meaning, as well as the implication such retellings have on social and familial...

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Modern Languages and Literatures in Translation (MLT) Courses – Description

Courses in Modern Literature, Culture, and Cinema in Translation (Taught in English). Faculty in the Department of Modern Languages & Literatures offer a variety of courses on works of literature, culture, cinema, and media that have been translated into English. “MLT” courses allow English-speaking students to engage with texts and other cultural artifacts from around the world to help them to develop the awareness of cultural diversity that is needed to be a global citizen in the twenty-first century.

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Portuguese Language Sequence

POR-100. Basic Portuguese I (Not offered 2013-14). A foundation course in Portuguese, open only to students who have been accepted for the following fall’s term abroad in Brazil. Study of the structure of the language supported by laboratory work, audio-lingual training.

POR-104T. Portuguese Language Studied Abroad (Fall). A continuation of Basic Portuguese I. Prerequisite: POR-100. See International Programs.

POR-200. Intermediate Portuguese I. (Spring, pending approval). Intermediate Portuguese I is an intensive and accelerated grammar review, and offers vocabulary growth. This course furthers the development of conversation, reading and writing skills based on a variety of cultural text and authentic cultural artifacts. CC: LCC

POR-490. Portuguese Independent Study. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

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Italian Language Sequence

ITL-100. Basic Italian I (Winter). A foundation course in Italian, open only to students who have been accepted for specific International Programs.

ITL-104T. The Italian Language Studied Abroad (Spring term in Florence). A continuation of Basic Italian I. Prerequisite: ITL-100. See International Programs.

ITL-250T, 251T. The Italian Language Studied Independently Abroad.

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Hebrew Language Sequence

HEB-100. Basic Hebrew I (Fall). The beginning of a year-long sequence of three courses designed to introduce students to the Hebrew language and to familiarize students with linguistic aspects that will prepare them to function with more advanced skills. Emphasis on learners’ ability to use the Hebrew language in all four skill areas, listening, reading, writing, and speaking, with particular attention given to mastering conversation in Hebrew.

HEB-101. Basic Hebrew II (Winter). Continuation of HEB-100.

HEB-102. Basic Hebrew III (Spring). Continuation of HEB-101.

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Arabic Language Sequence

ARB-100. Basic Arabic 1 (Fall). Basic skills for students who begin with no knowledge of Arabic.

ARB-101. Basic Arabic II (Winter). A continuation of ARB-100. Prerequisite: ARB-100 or permission of instructor.

ARB-102. Basic Arabic III (Spring). A continuation of ARB-101. Prerequisite: ARB-101 or permission of instructor.

ARB-200: Intermediate Arabic I (Fall). Review and continued development of all skills in Arabic. Prerequisite: ARB-102 or permission of the instructor.

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MLT-270. The Way of St. James: An Interdisciplinary Study

(Also AAH-212) (Winter, Martínez). Prerequisite to the course “Hiking the Trail in Spain.” Teaches the history, literature, art, and architecture of the route to Santiago de Compostela in northern Spain. Readings include selections from Berceo, the Songs of Mary, and various texts on Romanesque art and architecture. CC: HUL, LCC

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MLT-271T. Hiking the Trail in Spain

 (Also AAH-213T) (Summer, Martínez). Students who take this “mini-term” abroad must have taken MLT-270 on campus. The course takes place in Spain, where students will walk a portion of the actual route to Santiago de Compostela. CC: LCC, HUL

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MLT-272. Art and Politics in Spain: From the Civil War to Postfrancoism and Postmodernity

 (Not offered 2013-14). The impact that political events of this century in Spain have had on Spanish society and culture, as manifested in the arts in general and in literature in particular. CC: HUL, LCC

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MLT-273. Re-Viewing Spanish Cinema: From Dictators, Bullfighters and Flamenco to Nationalisms and Globalization

(Not offered 2013-14). This course examines the works of such well-known artists/filmmakers as Medem, Almodóvar, Bigas Luna, de la Iglesia, Aménabar, among others, who often directly engage with questions of “Spanishness,” of the nature of regional and ethnic diversity and identities within Spain, and the place of these identities in the wider framework of filmmaking in Europe. Furthermore, it will also study popular cinema which has been successful in a national context under the Franco regime and since the coming of democracy in the 1970s. CC: LCC, HUL

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MLT-281. Screening Identities in Latin American Cinema

(Not offered 2013-14 ). A survey of the main trends in film production in Latin America since the 1950s (Mexican Golden Age Cinema, Brazilian Cinema Novo, Cuban Imperfect Cinema, Mexican New Wave, the 1990’s and beyond). Readings and discussions on issues of film history, aesthetics, representation and reception will frame our critical reflection on the construction of identities (inner-city youth, gender roles, masculinities, race and ethnicity, and US Latinos). CC: HUL

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MLT-282. North/South Relations and Diasporic Politics

(Not offered 2013-14). This course explores the cultural and political interaction between North and South that historically has helped to define the geography of the Americas. As an interdisciplinary course, North/South will draw students into ongoing debates about linguistic and intercultural exchange and conflict within hemispheric politics. CC: HUL, LCC

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MLT-283. Beyond the Sunny Paradise: Literature and Politics in the Caribbean

(Not offered 2013-14). An interdisciplinary study of Caribbean literature focusing on the political history of the region from 1898 to the present. Pan-Caribbean literary survey (Alvarez, Arenas, Bosch, Cartagena-Portalatin, Zobel, Danticat, Ferre, Kincaid, Naipaul, Santos-Febres, Ana Lydia Vega, among others). Besides the literary texts, films and substantive readings will contribute to an examination of five main topics: Legacies of Colonialism; Race and Ethnicity; Constructed Identities; U.S. Dominance and Interventionism; and Caribbean Diaspora. CC: HUL, LCC

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MLT-284. Popular Religion and Politics in Latin America

 (Not offered 2013-14). In this course we will examine the connection between politics and popular religions in Latin America, taking a critical view of several of their manifestations without losing track of the language and “sciences” historically used to describe them. We will engage biblical, anthropological, videographic, ethno-historical and cultural theory texts as well as oral histories and collective memories. The final goal is to tease out those ideas that have traditionally defined the terms in which we understand and explain the “popular” in religious behavior; to understand...

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MLT-285. From Virgin to Sex Goddess: Re-Envisioning the Chicana Experience Through Art and Literature

(Not offered 2013-14). In “Guadalupe the Sex Goddess,” Sandra Cisneros gives the Virgin of Guadalupe an “extreme makeover.” She undresses the sacred image and envelops her in a cloak of contemporary sexual politics. In the same vein, other Chicana artists and writers re-examine, re-present, and re-write traditional practices to define the experience of the Mexican-American woman in the late 20th century. This course presents students with the resisting and affirming powers of Chicana works of art. It introduces them to the Mexican-American civil rights movement and to myths and archetypes in...

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MLT-286T. Gender and Identity in Contemporary Brazilian Cinema

(Fall, Mosquera).The course is a survey of contemporary Brazilian cinema focusing on issues of representation, reception and spectatorship, and construction of (national, cultural, gender, and racial) identity. Besides the films, reviews and substantive readings will contribute to an examination of five main topics: 1) Constructions of Gender; 2) Representations of National Identity; 3) Race and Class; 4) Queer Images; and, 5) Imagining Marginality. All films studied in class will link two or more of these topics. CC: LCC, HUL

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MLT-287. Filming Margins: Cinema Verité and Social Realism in Latin America

 (Not offered 2013-14). This course studies different styles of documentary and realist film making from Latin America. It looks critically and with a “film-eye” at the aesthetics and socio-political meanings of conventional and experimental documentary films dealing with marginalized peoples and their representation, such as Buñuel’s Los Olvidados (1950), Hector Babenco’s Pixote (1981) and Fernando Meirelles’ City of God (2002), and others. CC: LCC, HUL

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MLT-288. Torture and Dictatorship in Latin American Literature

(Not offered 2013-14). This course is an exploration of Latin-American literature in the twentieth century with a particular focus on the Dirty War in Argentina (1976-1983) and the early years after the military coups in Uruguay and Chile during the same time period. Readings include texts by writers who stayed in Argentina and Chile and who wrote under the confines of censorship, texts by exiled writers and essays theories of violence, torture and censorship. The class will also include viewings and analysis of films related to the events in those countries. We will also discuss the...

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MLT-289. Literature of the Mexican-American Border

(Not offered 2013-14). This is a class in literature, film and essays from both sides of the Mexican-American border. This course is designed to give students an under-standing of the complexities of the history, culture and sense of identity of residents from both sides. The class will be discussion based and will focus on the close readings of novels, poems, short stories and plays. CC: HUL, LCC

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MLT-293. Made in New York: Puerto Rican and Dominican Transnational Identities in American Literature & Cinema

(Fall, García) The course is a survey of the cultural production and representation of the Dominican and Puerto Rican communities in New York City from the late 1950’s to the present. Through the analysis of literary texts (narrative, poetry, theater) and films, students are encouraged to reflect on the forging of transnational identities and other issues (race, cultural identity, gender and masculinities) related to these two Caribbean diasporic communities in the U.S., and on the politics of their representation within the American cultural economy. CC: HUL

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MLT-294. Generation X: Global Youth Culture in Fiction and Film

(Not offered 2013-14) In this course we will examine the production of Generation X literature and culture worldwide. We will begin the course by gaining an understanding of the roots and meaning of “Generation X” since the US post-war period, to its various outgrowths around the world. We will examine how the axis of a “GenX” consciousness plays itself out in countries around the world in narrative, film, art, and music. Possible authors, artists and directors include Canadian Douglas Coupland, American Richard Linklater, Spaniard Ray Loriga, Chilean Alberto Fuguet, Bolivian Edmundo...

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MLT-262. Russia: Magnificence, Mayhem, and Mafia

 (Not offered 2013-2014). Through analysis of literature, film, and visual arts we will discuss the Russian impact on the world with all its manifestations, constructive and destructive, and we will also attempt to “imagine” Russia in the future. Do you want to know more about Dostoevsky, communist and post-communist Russia, and, most importantly, the Russian Mafia? CC: HUL LCC

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MLT-264. Illness and Its Representation: Madness, Disease and Death in 19th- and 20th-Century Russian Culture

(Not offered 2013-2014). In this course we will investigate illness and its various representations in 19th and 20th century Russian culture. Specific emphasis will be placed on madness, disease and death in our discussion of various literary and historical madmen. The course will be conducted as a combination of lectures and class discussion. An occasional film will be shown. CC: HUL, LCC

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MLT-265. Soviet and Russian Film Revolutions: Political, Social, Cultural.

(Not offered 2013-2014). At its inception, Soviet film was intertwined with political revolution. In masterpieces such as Eisenstein’s The Battleship Potemkin and Pudovkin’s Mother, film directors sought to portray the Bolshevik take-over as a legitimate and inevitable response to oppression. Who could imagine that the same country would produce Little Vera, a film about the sexual revolution of the 1980s or Brother, a hero-story about assassins? This course will follow the trajectory of Soviet and Russian cinema from the 1917 Revolution to the present day, as it was used to chronicle social...

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MLT-260. The Vampire as Other in East European and American Culture

 (Not offered 2013-2014). We will discuss the present distribution of the East European peoples, their prehistory, and their relation to other peoples of Europe and Asia. We will also survey their early culture, including pagan, animistic, and dualistic religious beliefs, and Christianization. Our focus will be the myth of the vampire, which has had enduring power not only in Eastern European folk belief but also in American popular culture right up to the present day. CC: HUL, LCC .

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MLT-250. Japanese Sociolinguistics

 (Not offered  2013-14). This course will focus on societal aspects which are represented in the characteristics of language. Discussions will include gender differences, formality, and communication strategies. This course will be taught in English and no prior Japanese language knowledge is required. CC: LCC, HUL

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MLT-254. Explore Japanese Manga and Anime

(Fall; Ueno). This course examines the rich world of Japanese manga (comic books) and anime (animation), one of the most significant cultural products in Japan and a dominant global media export. The topics include the issues of the relationship between humans and nature; gender relations; humans and technology; “Japaneseness” of anime; and globalization of manga. This course will be taught in English and no prior Japanese language knowledge is required. CC: LCC HUL

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MLT-234. Femmes fatales? Women in 19th- and 20th-Century German Culture and Society

 (Also GER-334) (Not offered 2013-14). An examination of female sexuality as one of the central controversies of modern German culture. In addition to analyzing cultural artifacts (plays, films, paintings), we will discuss such diverse social phenomena as the Women’s movement, morality crusades, psychoanalysis, and sexology. CC: HUL, LCC

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MLT-235. Voices from Abroad: German Exile Culture, 1933-1990

 (Also GER-335) (Not offered 2013-2014). This course, taught in translation, is designed for both Germanists and other students of literature interested in exploring notions of exile and the particular cultural artifacts, including novels, films, essays and poetry, that bear witness to the struggle of artists exiled from WWII Germany and Austria. The class additionally examines texts by current émigrés to Germany and incorporates theoretical assessments of exile, considering works by Said, Milosz and others. CC: HUL, LCC

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MLT-236. Poetry, Performance, Protest & Power: A History of Twentieth-Century Germany.

 (Also GER-338) (Not offered 2013-14) This course explores the legacy of 20th century German literature and cultural history through its poetic tradition of performance and protest, while analyzing the political, social, and cultural climate and the shifts in understandings of gender, race, class and generational relations during this critical century in contemporary German history. CC: HUL, LCC

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MLT-237. Of Ghosts and Demons: Encountering the Uncanny in German Literature

 (Also GER-341) (Winter, Nelson). From ghost children, animated statues, ominous angels, and the walking dead to machine women, demons, and doppelgängers, German literature teems with things that go bump in the night. The course examines encounters with the supernatural as depicted throughout German literature, with special focus on Romanticism’s fascination with das Unheimliche (“the uncanny”), in order to sketch the history of this tradition of fantastic literature in German, trace its origins, and present its main authors and defining features. Readings include works by Goethe, Kleist,...

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MLT-336. The Thrill of Victory: Reading German Sports (and) Culture

 (Also GER-336) (Not offered 2013-14). This course traces the ways that Sports have reflected and influenced German culture through the 20th century, analyzing links between athleticism and conceptions of gender, nationhood, individuality and race set out in literary texts, films, and visual arts. Exploring notions of victory, physical perfection, and spectatorship, we will consider works by some of Germany’s greatest authors and artists, including Kafka, Schnitzler, Brecht, Riefenstahl, Kirschner and Handke. CC: HUL, LCC 

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MLT-339. The Shoah in Film: Cinematic Treatments of Holocaust Trauma and Memory

 (Also Ger-339) (Not offered 2013-14). The course examines cinematic representations of the Holocaust in the films of German, German-Jewish, and other European filmmakers. Comparing and contrasting a variety of film genres and cinematic techniques, we explore fundamental questions about the relationships between art and history, representation and experience and memory and responsibility. By considering theoretical and historical readings as well, we situate the films within significant intellectual and historical contexts. CC: LCC, HUL

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MLT-211. Histoire de la danse, Danse de l’histoire / History of Dance, Dance of History

 (Also FRN-421, ADA-153) (Not offered 2013-14). Examination of Western European dance and dance texts as revelatory of broader historical and cultural patterns, with special analyses of dance as a key tool of nation-building (as with the court of Louis XIV) and/or a central medium of artistic creation (as in 1920s Paris). Primary focus on France as creator, user, and potential abuser of dance’s power, but some attention given other European models (Berlin, St. Petersburg, London). Readings from theoreticians, historians, and dance littérateurs (Molière, Gautier, Cocteau). CC: HUL,...

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MLT-212: Sex Lives and Videotape: Casting Sexuality in French and Francophone Film

 (Also FRN-402) (Not offered 2013-14). Analysis and critique of films whose focus is the “sexual orientation” of its characters. Films may include La Cage aux folles, Les Diaboliques, French Twist, Sitcom, Ma Vie en rose, Woubi Chéri. Theoretical and critical works by authors such as Michel Foucault, Monique Wittig, Simone de Beauvoir, Susan Hayward, Laura Mulvey, Sigmund Freud, and Kate Bornstein will inform our study of these films. Readings in both French and English. All films subtitled. CC: LCC, HUL

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MLT-213. West African Oral Literature

 (Also FRN 430) (not offered 2013-2014). West-African oral genres with a focus on tales and epics in their form and ideologies. Through a study of the oral literature of the region, we will explore the socio-cultural structures of ancient West Africa, their collapse through religious and colonial implications, and their vestiges in today’s Africa. CC: HUL, LCC

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MLT-215. What is French Cinéma?/Qu’est-ce que le cinéma français? (

(Also FRN-312) (Winter; Chilcoat). This course moves from an introduction to the earliest examples of French and world cinema, to an in-depth study of widely recognized classics of French cinema, considered in chronological order from 1933 to 1985, so as to develop an appreciation for the history, genre, and particular theme(s) of each film, as well as its originality. Students will learn how to talk about and write analytical papers on the films according to critical, cultural, and technological considerations, in order to determine what, if anything, is particularly “French” about French...

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MLT-200: Modern Chinese Literature

(Spring, Ferry). An introduction to Chinese literature in the 20th Century. The publishing industry, and especially literature, played an influential role in shaping China’s modern development. Students will study the origins of the New Culture movement’s “new literature,” analyze “revolutionary romanticism” and art for the masses, as well as examine contemporary works of popular fiction. The course relates China’s literary and cultural trends within the local and global dimensions of modernity. All works in English. CC: HUL, LCC 

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MLT-201. Chinese Cinema

(Not offered 2013-14). From the glitzy production studios of 1930s Shanghai to the contemporary hinterlands of China, the backstreets of Hong Kong, and the towns of Taiwan, this course examines the development and transformation of Chinese cinema. It explores questions of aesthetics, Chinese identity, transnationalism, and representation. All films subtitled. CC: HUL, LCC

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MLT-202. Gender and Sexuality in Modern China

 (Also WGS 202) (Fall, Ferry). The course examines gender and sexuality in 20th-century China as a gateway to understanding the political, cultural, and economic realities of China today. We consider the figure of the “New Woman” during China’s civil war and World War II, the androgynous ideal after the founding of the People’s Republic, the “Successful Man” during China’s economic reform, and the articulations of “Comrades” as part of local, national, and international conversations. Readings in English. All films subtitled. CC: HUL, LCC

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MLT-203: Asian American Film and Performance

 (Also WGS 268) (Not offered 2013-14). An examination of topics in Asian American studies through film and performance by and about Asian Americans. Class material draws from independent filmmakers, theatrical and artistic performances, as well as theoretical and critical texts on culture and diversity, gender, the diaspora, and ethnicity. CC: HUL, LCC

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MLT-204: Literary Traditions in East Asia

 (Winter, Zhang). Literary developments in East Asia, looking closely at the aesthetic and philosophic foundations of its varied literature through poetic genres, story forms, oral storytelling, travel literature, and drama. CC: HUL, LCC

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MLT-205: Perspectives in Modern East Asian Literature

 (Not offered 2013-14). The literary and artistic developments in East Asia since the mid-19th century. The course considers questions of tradition, culture, modernity, globalism, and technology by examining cultural artifacts — novels, short stories, plays, paintings, architecture, music, and film. CC: HUL

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MLT-209: The New Wall of China

(Also ENS 222) (Not offered 2013-14). An interdisciplinary overview of dams and development, with specific attention to the socio-cultural, historical, economic, and environmental attributes of a region in China whose geo-political landscape has been dramatically impacted by the construction of the Three Gorges Dam. In providing a context to the dam’s construction, students will be introduced to the intricate connections between all the above factors and engineering, technology, and the environment. CC: HUL, LCC, SET

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