EMBODY – Virtual Exhibition at SNHU

EMBODY – Virtual Exhibition at SNHU

The McIninch Art Gallery at Southern New Hampshire University is proud to present the virtual exhibition of EMBODY. This exhibition originated at the Mandeville Gallery, Union College, from August 24, 2019, to January 19, 2020. Support for this virtual exhibition and its accompanying digital catalog comes from the Samuel P. Hunt Foundation.

EMBODY

EMBODY

EMBODY features contemporary diasporic artists, who use collage, both conceptually, and in some cases, literally, as a technique to construct identity and/or selfhood within the mode of portraiture or figuration in the visual arts.

A Decolonial Atlas: Strategies in Contemporary Art of the Americas

A Decolonial Atlas: Strategies in Contemporary Art of the Americas

Drawing from the hemispheric context of the Americas, and broad questions of civilization and culture, A Decolonial Atlas: Strategies in Contemporary Art of the Americas presents recent works by artists from the United States and Latin America grappling with continued questions of colonialism and post-colonialism in an effort to locate “place” in contemporary society.

Jenny Kemp: Slow Grow

Jenny Kemp: Slow Grow

Jenny Kemp has been exploring the possibilities of organic abstraction for more than a decade. This fertile territory has afforded her the visual language and conceptual means to examine a collection of ideas, including biology and histories of modern abstraction. In Kemp’s vibrant paintings, space and light are built through the placement of intricate parallel lines that shift slowly in hue and intensity.

Probability & Uncertainty

Probability & Uncertainty

As Union College embarked on the new building and renovation project for our Science and Engineering departments last year, the moment seemed well-suited to re-examine the historic scientific instruments held in the Union College Permanent Collection. This culminated with the exhibition Probability & Uncertainty, featuring more than 30 instruments, juxtaposed with the works of six contemporary female artists creating with scientific themes. 

Laini Nemett: When We Lived Here

Laini Nemett: When We Lived Here

Artist Laini Nemett works with cardboard models, collage, and large-scale oil paintings to create architectural environments that explore the idea of home in the exhibition, When We Lived Here. Nemett describes her work as a response to, “personal histories as recalled by the buildings that house them…I collage and collapse planes to conjure the passing of time and the generations of lives lived between the aging walls.”

Radical Kingdoms

Radical Kingdoms

In the exhibition, Radical Kingdoms, contemporary works are juxtaposed with early practitioners’ works, such as John James Audubon’s The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America, and lesser-known artists of the time, such as J. Sowerby, Mary Peart, and Georg Dionysius Ehret, in order to highlight artistic similarities and formal shifts away from traditional modes of presentation.