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Photographer Judith Glickman, chronicler of Holocaust, to speak April 14 at Union College’s Nott Memorial

Posted on Mar 30, 1998

Schenectady, N.Y. (March 30, 1998) – Photographer Judith Ellis Glickman, whose photographs comprise the Holocaust remembrance exhibit Of Light Amidst the Darkness – The Danish Rescue at Union College, will give a gallery talk and slide presentation on her work on Tuesday, April 14, at 8 p.m. in Union's Nott Memorial.

Her talk — part of Lessons for Humanity, a series of Holocaust remembrance events at Union College — is free and open to the public.

Glickman, the daughter of California pictorialist photographer Irving Bennett Ellis, studied at UCLA, the Maine Photographic Workshop, and the Maine College of Art. Her interest in Holocaust-related images began in the early 1980s, when she volunteered at the Martyrs Memorial Museum of the Holocaust in Los Angeles. She took portraits of survivors, including Elie Wiesel, and photographed the museum's artifacts.

In 1988, she photographed sites where millions of Jews were exterminated. In 1992, the Thanks to Scandinavia Foundation commissioned Glickman to photograph Danish resistance leaders, rescuers, survivors, and sites relating to the Danish resistance (the subject of the show on display through April 23 in the Nott Memorial).

Her awards include Fellowship Distinction, the highest honor awarded by the Royal Photographic Society of Great Britain. She is affiliated with Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York. Glickman's work is represented in over 200 private collections as well as the Whitney Museum of American Art; the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, D.C.; the Jewish Museum, New York; and the Denver Art Museum. Glickman's images have been published in over 100 periodicals and books, including The Royal Photographic Society Journal, The New York Times, Art News, and Art Pictorialist Photographer.

“Although I was familiar with this tragic period and had photographed Holocaust-related subject matter for over 10 years, it wasn't until I had stood inside Auschwitz for that first time that this work become personal, real, and immediate,” Glickman said.

Lessons for Humanity is presented by Union College and the Holocaust Survivors and Friends Education Center. Major support is provided by an anonymous donor from the Union College family.

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Michael Marrus, specialist in European fascism and Holocaust, speaks on “Vichy France and the Jews” April 8

Posted on Mar 27, 1998

Schenectady, N.Y. (March 27, 1998) – Historian and author Michael Marrus will give a talk titled “Vichy France and the Jews” on Wednesday, April 8, at 8 p.m. in Reamer Campus Center Auditorium at Union College.

Marrus, author of the book Vichy France and the Jews and dean of graduate studies and professor of history at the University of Toronto, will provide a look at how historians have considered the role of Vichy in the European-wide persecution and murder of Jews in World War II.

Marrus' lecture — part of Lessons for Humanity, a series of Holocaust remembrance events at Union College — is free and open to the public.

Professor Marrus, who earned his Ph.D. at Berkeley, is interested in European fascism and the Holocaust. He is the author of five books on these and related subjects. Others include The Unwanted: European Refugees in the Twentieth Century (1985) and The Holocaust in History (1987). He has been a Guggenheim Fellow, and a visiting fellow of St. Anthony's College, Oxford and the Institute for Advanced Studies of Hebrew University. He has recently published The Nuremberg War Crimes Trial 1945-46: A Documentary History.

Lessons for Humanity is presented by Union College and the Holocaust Survivors and Friends Education Center. Major support is provided by an anonymous donor from the Union College family.

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Judy Goldstein, founder of Humanity in Action, to discuss Danish resistance to Nazi occupation on April 5 at Union

Posted on Mar 23, 1998

Schenectady, N.Y. (March 23, 1998) – Historian and author Judy Goldstein will give a talk titled “Resistance: Then and Now” on the Danish resistance to Nazi occupation on Sunday, April 5, at 8 p.m. in Reamer Campus Center Auditorium at Union College.

Goldstein, founder and executive director of Humanity in Action — Resistance and Human Rights, will focus her talk on the Danish resistance to Nazi occupation after the April 9, 1940 invasion.

The event — part of Lessons for Humanity, a series of Holocaust remembrance events at Union College — is free and open to the public.

Goldstein's talk comes as Union features Of Light Amidst the Darkness – The Danish Rescue, an exhibit of photography by Judith Ellis Glickman. The show runs through April 23 in Union's Nott Memorial. (Ms. Glickman will give a gallery talk on April 14, at 8 p.m. in the Nott Memorial.)

Lessons for Humanity is presented by Union College and the Holocaust Survivors and Friends Education Center. Major support is provided by an anonymous donor from the Union College family.

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American premiere and discussion of documentary on Nazi-hunters Serge and Beate Klarsfeld is April 2 at Union

Posted on Mar 23, 1998

Schenectady, N.Y. (March 23, 1998) – Shelly Shapiro, director of the Holocaust Survivors and Friends Education Center, will lead a discussion after the American premiere of the film Pour Memoire, a documentary on the work of Serge and Beate Klarsfeld on Thursday, April 2, at 8 p.m. in Reamer Campus Center Auditorium at Union College.

The program — part of Lessons for Humanity, a series of Holocaust remembrance events through April 23 at Union College — is free and open to the public.

The Klarsfelds are called “Nazi hunters” for bringing Klaus Barbie and others to justice — and for their major role in the trial now making headlines in France of a former cabinet minister.

But Serge and Beate Klarsfeld have devoted themselves not just to capturing the perpetrators of Nazi terror but to remembering their victims. Thus, Serge Klarsfeld's most recent book, French Children of the Holocaust, is devoted to children sent from France to the death camps. A book “borne of my obsession that these children will not be forgotten,” according to Klarsfeld, it contains 2,500 photos and short biographies of the children.

Residents of France, the Klarsfelds came to Union March 15 to open the exhibit based on Mr. Klarsfeld's book. The exhibit runs through April 23 in Union's Nott Memorial. Shelly Shapiro is educational consultant for the traveling show, which is being viewed this month in Union's Nott Memorial by thousands of area schoolchildren.

Serge is a Jew who as a child just missed being sent to Auschwitz. Beate is the daughter of a soldier in Hitler's army. Together they have devoted their lives to not letting the world forget the Nazi era.

Lessons for Humanity: French Children of the Holocaust – A Memorial Exhibition and Of Light Amidst the Darkness – The Danish Rescue is presented by Union College and the Holocaust Survivors and Friends Education Center. Major support is provided by an anonymous donor from the Union College family.

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Remembrances of Holocaust and Au Revoir Les Enfants to be featured March 30 in Holocaust series at Union College

Posted on Mar 23, 1998

Schenectady, N.Y. (March 23, 1998) – Ernest Nives, a Holocaust survivor, will discuss “Personal Remembrances of the Holocaust” on Monday, March 30, at 7 p.m. in the Reamer Campus Center Auditorium at Union College.

The event also will include a screening and discussion of the film Au Revoir, Les Enfants (Goodbye Children) by the late Louis Malle.

The event — part of Lessons for Humanity, a series of Holocaust remembrance events at Union College — is free and open to the public.

Nives, born in Vienna in 1925, was arrested in 1942 with his mother in central France. Sent by the Vichy police to the regional assembly camp in Montlu├žon, they were transferred to Drancy concentration camp and deported a month later. Nives' father, Bernard, was imprisoned in Dachau and Buchenwald in 1938 and 1939 before seeking refuge with his family in France. His brother, Fred, emigrated to the U.S. in 1940 and served in the U.S. Army.

Nives' photograph as a child appears in the book French Children of the Holocaust, on which the current exhibit in Union's Nott Memorial is based. He now lives in New York City, and has been active in preserving the memory of Holocaust victims.

Au Revoir, Les Enfants, made in 1987 by the late Louis Malle chronicles the director's boyhood experience at a boarding school in Avon, France. Three Jewish boys, hidden by Father Jacques, become the tragic heroes of the film as authorities remove them. As the boys were being led away, Malle remembers, “I will remember that cold January morning the rest of my life.”

Lessons for Humanity: French Children of the Holocaust – A Memorial Exhibition and Of Light Amidst the Darkness – The Danish Rescue is presented by Union College and the Holocaust Survivors and Friends Education Center. Major support is provided by an anonymous donor from the Union College family.

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